And yet it moves! Digital and self-organising teams with a little help from Galileo

  This summer, after a lovely 2 week holiday in Tuscany, I returned to Leeds and straight into a classroom full of government senior leaders discussing agile and user-centred design. Their challenges set me thinking once more about the relationship between technology and social relations in the world of work. One well-known story from the Italy … Continue reading And yet it moves! Digital and self-organising teams with a little help from Galileo

On the way to dConstruct: a social constructionist thought for the day

A desire to put some theoretical acro props under my vague unease with the determinist narrative of so much of our technology discourse has led me to the writing of the French anthropologist Bruno Latour. His work on the social construction of science, an ethnography of the R&D lab, has a special resonance for me, … Continue reading On the way to dConstruct: a social constructionist thought for the day

When too much perspective can be a bad thing

An article by my former colleague and TEDx Leeds speaker Norman Lewis reminds me of an ingenious device imagined by Douglas Adams in the Restaurant at the End of the Universe. Yes, I know you all like a good Douglas Adams quote. First, though, listen to Norman, writing about ‘Millennials’ and Enterprise2.0 on his Futures … Continue reading When too much perspective can be a bad thing

Ten years on, can we stop worrying now?

Ten years ago this month the Sunday Times published an article by Douglas Adams called "How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet". You can read it here. Some starting observations: It's a tragedy that Adams died, aged 49, in 2001, depriving us of more great literature in the vein of the Hitchhiker’s Guide, … Continue reading Ten years on, can we stop worrying now?

Here Comes Everybody bigger (and smaller) than ever before

Back in May I blogged about Clay Shirky's book "Here Comes Everybody". I was torn: I wanted to believe that social media could indeed make the world a better place, yet my inner history graduate protested that people are people, and have communicated and interacted for good and ill since time immemorial. In "Television may … Continue reading Here Comes Everybody bigger (and smaller) than ever before

Second verse, same as the first, a little bit louder and a little bit worse

Two recent news stories continue my theme that social media doesn't so much change people's behaviour, as expose pre-existing behaviours for all to see, often with unexpected consequences. Exhibit 1: 'Dumbest criminal' records crimes A Leeds man has been dubbed the city's "dumbest criminal" by a councillor for posting videos of anti-social behaviour on the … Continue reading Second verse, same as the first, a little bit louder and a little bit worse

Erm, excuse me, but I think Everybody was here all along

It's taken me a while (and 83 more pages of Here Comes Everybody) to understand my unease with the "technology changes everything" discourse around social media, and now to reach an alternative hypothesis. In my last post I questioned whether the advent of the internet in the place of television could, as Clay Shirky suggests, … Continue reading Erm, excuse me, but I think Everybody was here all along