A bath, a clock and a giant walking robot – it’s Heritage Open Days this weekend

It’s Heritage Open Days from 9-12 September, a once-a-year chance of free access to properties that are usually closed to the public or charge for admission. Buildings all over England will be open, except in London where you have to wait a week for Open House on 18-19 September.

Like every year I’m spoiled for choice with stuff to see. There are more than 75 things to do in Leeds alone.

Seven of my personal favourites:

A Walk around the 18th Century Claremont Estate at Little Woodhouse – looking at the original estate and its development into Denison Hall, Hanover and Woodhouse Squares, the Claremont streets, Park Lane College and Joseph’s Well (the former Barron’s Mill).

Heritage at Risk Exhibition – photos on display at the Leeds Civic Trust on Wharf Street. See the shocking state of some of the city’s most significant buildings now at risk through neglect. (Disclosure – my wife Caroline is one of the volunteers who have done a brilliant job on updating and documenting the Heritage At Risk Register.)

Holbeck: Cradle of the Industrial Revolution – Civic Trust experts lead a walk through the urban village.

St Aidan’s Walking Dragline – a rare piece of our mining heritage lovingly cared for by volunteers, and, what more can I say, it’s a Giant Walking Robot!

Temple Works – if you live in Leeds and you don’t know Temple Works, now’s your chance. One of the city’s most remarkable buildings, cruelly neglected but now slowly coming back to life.

The Bath House – a miraculous survival from the days when 17th Century aristocrats bathed in the fresh spring waters of Gledhow Valley.

Town Hall & Clock Tower Tours – Cuthbert Brodrick’s masterpiece, as seen on TV!

And if those are not enough, there’s more on Alex’s brilliant new blog, Exploring Leeds, and some additional suggestions on the Leeds Guide website.

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mattedgar

Product strategy and design leadership in web and mobile media. Before that I was a newspaper journalist and history student

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